Joe Hart

Indisputably England’s first-choice goalkeeper.

That he never shows any complacency despite his secure position is a testament to his professionalism.

Jack Butland

No chance of usurping Hart - either now or at any stage over the next few years - but it is definitely a plus that he is playing regularly in the Premier League.

The outright No. 2 in the prolonged absence of Ben Foster and Fraser Forster.

Ben Foster

A lucky-dip pick between him and his nearly-namesake Forster.

Both are recovering from long-term knee injuries - whoever returns first will be primed to take the third and final spot.

Nathaniel Clyne

Position looked uncertain after being substituted at half-time against Italy in March and then left out against the Republic of Ireland and Slovenia in June.

Has started three of the last four games, though, and lack of alternatives helps him.

Gary Cahill

Has endured a mixed start to the season at Chelsea, but remains England’s first-choice centre-half.

His status as vice-captain and one of the most experienced players in the squad provides extra security.

Chris Smalling

A remarkable transformation in 12 months, having gone from unfulfilled potential personified following his daft sending off against Manchester City last season to one of the Premier League’s outstanding defenders.

Will start in France.

Luke Shaw

Started the season brilliantly and would have been one of England’s key players next summer had he not suffered a double leg fracture.

Is likely to be selected if he returns to action by March, but the 20-year-old shouldn’t rush. Ryan Bertrand on standby.

John Stones

Will replace Cahill when World Cup qualifying begins, but will have to settle for being back-up - both at centre-half and right-back - for the Euros.

Like Rio Ferdinand at France 98, the stylish defender will gain invaluable experience even if he doesn’t play.

Phil Jones

International career has meandered in the four years since he made his England debut, but is bound to be picked.

Must win back his Manchester United place first before he can challenge for an England one. Is likely to provide cover at right-back and, worryingly, in midfield.

Phil Jagielka

Humbled against world-class opposition in Brazil last year and not good enough to start.

His experience and temperament in a youthful squad will be useful, though.

Leighton Baines

See Phil Jagielka. media Jordan Henderson

Curiously, a guaranteed starter despite never producing an impressive performance for the national side.

That is probably due to a combination of his all-action style, a lack of genuine alternatives and the injury proneness of his team-mates.

Jack Wilshere

The outstanding brace in Slovenia - his first goals for England - felt like a significant moment for a player who can no longer be regarded as potential.

But injury - a hairline fracture of his leg this time - has once again stalled his progress. A definite starter if healthy, but the team cannot be built around him. Sad.

Fabian Delph

Added much-needed dynamism to England’s midfield during a slew of enterprising displays in qualifying, most notably away at Switzerland.

Is an established member of the squad, but the two hamstring injuries he has suffered at Manchester City - plus the amount of first-team football he can realistically expect this season - is a concern.

James Milner

An uninspired but inevitable selection. Can be deployed in various positions and will perform dutifully in all of them without truly impressing in any.

Ross Barkley

Only doubt surrounding his role within the squad is whether he will start or be an impact substitute.

If he continues the form he has shown this season - five goals in 14 games for club and country - it has to be the former, even if that means playing as one of a midfield three.

Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain

A Hodgson favourite ever since his opening-game selection against France at Euro 2012. Should have made himself an automatic selection for club and country by now.

Likely to feature on the right of a 4-4-3, although is an option centrally if the fitness of Delph and, in particular, Wilshere, fails.

Wayne Rooney

Has endured an inauspicious start to the season and manager Roy Hodgson says his place is not guaranteed because he is captain. He is fibbing, of course.

While the striker has lost much of his early-career fizz, he remains England’s most reliable - and likely - source of goals.

Raheem Sterling

An indispensable member of the squad who will start in one of the front three positions. Not bad for a player who doesn’t turn 21 until December.

Has added goals to his game - two in four England appearances in 2015 - and being at Manchester City will improve him.

Theo Walcott

Playing the best football of his career and, nearly 10 years after his international debut, can finally establish himself as first choice if he maintains his new-found aggression.

Has unhappy memories of major international tournaments, but should be emboldened by his unfamiliar position as one of England’s senior men.

Harry Kane

Unlikely to enjoy a season as prolific as the last one, but is comfortable at international level and a stellar option to play either alongside or instead of Rooney depending on the situation.

A worry, though, is what state a player who looks jaded in October will be once June comes around.

Danny Welbeck

Not expected to return from the knee injury that has kept him out since April until the New Year at the earliest, but is a certainty to be included.

Deservedly so, too. Has been one of England’s most effective performers under Hodgson and boasts an outstanding goalscoring record at international level.

Daniel Sturridge

England’s most complete striker and, despite not representing his country since September 2014, will be picked - most probably from the start - if fit.

That, of course, is not certain considering the amount of football he has missed because of injury over the last 14 months.

Euro 2016 betting

READ: 5 players who can force their way into England's Euro 2016 squad